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Mathieu Basille
Clément Calenge
Jodie Martin
Bram van Moorter
Vincent Tolon
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PostGIS workshop: Instructors & Lecturers

Mathieu Basille

Mathieu Basille

Mathieu Basille is an Assistant Professor in Landscape Ecology at the University of Florida's Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center. He his primarily interested in the determinism of the spatial distributions of animal species, from fine (movement models) to large scale (distribution in the landscape) in relation to environmental features (e.g. climate change) and other species. His work lies on a strong theoretical and methodological basis using the concept of ecological niche, leading to applications for animal population management, as well as basic developments at the intersection of evolutionary ecology and behavioral ecology. His main study species are large vertebrates, such as lynx in Norway, caribou in Québec, and wood stork and sea turtles in Florida.

Anne Berger

Anne Berger

Anne Berger is a behavioral and conservation ecologist with focus on chronobiological research on wild (mostly terrestrial) animals. Since continuous and long-term measurements of behavioral or physiological data are necessary for chronobiological investigations, the major challenge at the beginning of her work was the development of wireless and low-energy tools providing such data that are usable on wildlife. She is one of the pioneers in the development and application of acceleration data on wild animals with a focus on applied conservation research.

Anne is a permanent researcher at the Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin, Germany, and leader of the work group "Chrono-Ecology" within the "Evolutionary Ecology" research group. Her special scientific interest is studying temporal structures in animal behavior on the basic idea of mutual interrelations between animals and their variable environment. This requires investigations on original behavioral adaptations and the temporal and spatial niches of species. She applies chronobiological algorithms to assess behavior patterns and to evaluate living conditions of animals and, thereby, she wants to develop a procedure for biorhythmic status diagnosis to identify system disorders and stress conditions of wild animals.

Also connected to Anne's research are questions about animal welfare for free living animals in extensive holding systems, and how welfare problems can be identified and solved.

David Bucklin

David Bucklin

David Bucklin is a geographer who graduated with a Master's degree from Oregon State University, completing a project focusing on remote sensing of land use change around protected areas. His professional interests are in geospatial technologies, particularly their application in conservation biology and landscape ecology. He has worked in the intersection of these fields at a conservation NGO and the University of Florida, where he worked on projects relating to threatened and endangered species' responses to climate change, including species distribution modeling, connectivity analyses, and analysis of telemetry datasets.

David currently works as a biological scientist in Dr. Mathieu Basille's lab in the University of Florida's Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department at the Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, where he manages the lab's animal movement databases, and builds tools to help researchers store, access, and analyze movement and related datasets.

Francesca Cagnacci

Francesca Cagnacci

Francesca Cagnacci is a behavioral and conservation ecologist with a research emphasis on effects of climate and global change on animal spatial distribution and movement. Her research interests span management and conservation practices at different spatial scales, ecosystem services, terrestrial mammalogy, ecology of wildlife diseases and host-parasite dynamics, and adoption of humane measures for the management of problematic wildlife.

Francesca is a permanent researcher at the Research and Innovation Centre at Edmund Mach Foundation for agriculture and environmental studies, in the Italian Alps. She is also a Faculty affiliate at the College of Forestry and Conservation, at the University of Montana. She is the 2015-2016 Hrdy Visiting Fellow in Conservation Biology at Harvard University. She initiated and coordinates the bottom-up research consortium EURODEER, to share and study movement data at the distribution range of deer species, under climatic and human-impact large scale gradients. She has been leading or advising fieldwork projects for 20 years on terrestrial mammals, from rodents to large herbivores and carnivores, in a diversity of environments and conservation areas in Europe, North and South America, with a special focus on mountainous and alpine environments.

Francesca combines biological research with a deep interest in development and application of technology to address conservation issues and animal ecology questions (biotelemetry). She pioneered the use of GPS (Global Positioning System) to study wildlife in the Alps, and collaborates with engineers and Information and Communication Technology scientists to 'export' state-of-the-art communication technologies and algorithms to ecology and conservation. She has recently developed interest in the application of next-generation sequencing to microbiomes and diet of ungulates, in relation to space use patterns and movement.

Hamish Campbell

Hamish Campbell

Hamish Campbell is a Senior Lecturer in Spatial Sciences at Charles Darwin University, Northern Territories, Australia. His background is in zoology, and he has integrated this discipline with spatial sciences to focus a research program within the emerging field of movement ecology. Hamish has a strong focus on developing and utilizing novel technologies and techniques to address the management challenges for threatened species. The lab collaborates with a host of partners to study the drivers of movement in a variety of species across freshwater, marine, and terrestrial environments. Hamish also has a keen interest in collaborative research cyber-infrastructure for the purposes of understanding and conserving our world.

Levente Juhász

Levente Juhász

Levente Juhász graduated with a master's degree in Geography from the University of Szeged, Hungary. He developed a strong background in GIS and worked as a GIS developer implementing web applications before starting his early career as a scientist. His main professional interest lies in the intersection of Geographic Information, computer science and their interactions in online environments. Before joining the Geomatics group at UF FLREC and starting his PhD program, he spent some time at the Digital Earth and Reference Data Unit of the JRC in Italy as a visiting scientist, where they worked on massive geo-social media data to extract information on urban quality of life.

Levente's research deals with contributors of Geographic Information in Web 2.0 platforms (be it a geotagged Instagram photo or a map edit), often referred to as Volunteered Geographic Information. His work focuses on individual users, and tries to match their spatial footprints from different sources, revealing interesting patterns, understanding their motivation, which will eventually lead towards better quality control over user generated datasets.

Besides his studies, Levente does some work for a geospatial startup called Mapillary as a data scientist. Their vision is to cover the world with crowdsourced, geotagged street level photos. Levente is enthusiastic about Open Data and Open Source Software. In his spare time, he enjoys cycling, hiking and mapping areas where more geodata is needed.

Simona Picardi

Simona Picardi

Simona Picardi earned her Master's degree in Ecobiology from the University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy. Her research interests are primarily related to movement ecology. Her MSc thesis was developed at Edmund Mach Foundation, Italy, in the context of a multi-year project focused on space use and habitat selection of European ungulates. Particularly, she has been working on roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) movement trajectories, to assess the effects of natural and anthropogenic processes on their patterns.

Simona is currently a PhD student in Mathieu Basille's lab at the University of Florida (Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center). Her PhD research will explore the movement ecology of wood stork (Mycteria americana) in the Southeastern US, in order to assess the role of individual variability in migratory behavior in determining population vulnerability to global change.

Ferdinando Urbano

Ferdinando Urbano

Ferdinando Urbano is a free lance consultant. He works as a spatial analyst for environmental modeling and management with specific expertise in GIS and spatial databases. He has 15 years of professional experience in Europe (Germany, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain), Africa (Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Morocco, Mozambique, Niger, Tanzania), Asia (Nepal, Pakistan), and Middle East (Lebanon) in a wide range of technical domains such as wildlife management, food security, forestry, agriculture, and rural development. His scientific and technical interests focus on data management for better science and environmental management.